Author Topic: EPA.. protecting the environment  (Read 1808 times)

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Offline zeker

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EPA.. protecting the environment
« on: August 08, 2015, 05:31:42 AM »
if you spill a drop of gas on your property, the epa will fine you into oblivion.
 
but
 
EPA spills 1M gals of crap into the Animas River CHECK OUT THE PIC AT LINK      <blockquote>http://www.usnews.com/news/us/articl...wn-river-to-nm

Animas River Filled With Gunk
Sludge from Colorado mine spill heads down river to New Mexico, towns take precautions.

People kayak in the Animas River near Durango, Colo., Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015, in water colored from a mine waste spill. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said that a cleanup team was working with heavy equipment Wednesday to secure an entrance to the Gold King Mine. Workers instead released an estimated 1 million gallons of mine waste into Cement Creek, which flows into the Animas River.
People kayak in the Animas River near Durango, Colo., on Thursday, in water colored from a mine waste spill.


Associated Press Aug. 7, 2015 | 3:42 a.m. EDT + More

By KRISTEN WYATT, Associated Press

DENVER (AP) A plume of orange-ish muck from million-gallon mine waste spill in Colorado was headed down river to New Mexico, prompting communities along the water route to take precautions until the sludge passes.

Officials emphasized that there was no threat to drinking water from the spill. But downstream water agencies were warned to avoid Animas River water until the plume passes, said David Ostrander, director of the EPA's emergency response program in Denver.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said that a cleanup team was working with heavy equipment Wednesday to secure an entrance to the Gold King Mine in southwest Colorado. Workers instead released an estimated 1 million gallons of mine waste into Cement Creek.


100 million gallons of wastewater spill into Animas River and more
Denver Post

"The project was intended to pump and treat the water and reduce metals pollution flowing out of the mine," agency spokesman Rich Mylott said in a statement.

The creek runs into the Animas, which then flows into the San Juan River in New Mexico and joins the Colorado River in Utah.

Officials weren't sure how long it would take the plume to dissipate, Ostrander said. The acidic sludge is made of heavy metal and soil, which could irritate the skin, he said.

The EPA was testing the plume to see which metals were released. Previous contamination from the mine sent iron, aluminum, cadmium, zinc and copper into the water, said Peter Butler, co-coordinator of the Animas River Stakeholders Group.

Earlier Thursday, the EPA said in a statement that the polluted water "was held behind unconsolidated debris near an abandoned mine portal."

[READ: Obama's Clean Power Plan Benefits Too Good to Be True]

As the plume headed toward New Mexico, that state's governor said the EPA waited too long to tell her about the problem.

Gov. Susana Martinez is disturbed by the lack of information provided by the agency to New Mexico's environmental agencies, said Chris Sanchez, a spokesman for the governor. Sanchez said that the state was not told of the spill until almost a full day after it happened.

The plume made its way to Durango on Thursday afternoon, prompting La Plata County health officials to warn rafters and others to avoid the water. The scenic waterway was the backdrop for parts of the movie "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" and is popular with summer boaters.

Durango stopped pumping water out of the Animas River on Wednesday to make sure none of the waste could be sucked up into the city reservoir. It also suspended the transfers of raw water to a local golf course and Fort Lewis College. Pet owners were advised to keep dogs and livestock out of the Animas.

"It's really, really ugly," Butch Knowlton, La Plata County's director of emergency preparedness, told The Durango Herald. "Any kind of recreational activity on the river needs to be suspended."

[LINK: Environment Trumps Genes at Shaping Immune System: Study]

In Farmington, New Mexico, city officials shut down water-supply intake pumps to avoid contamination and advised citizens to stay out of the river until the discoloration has passed. Don Cooper, emergency manager in San Juan County, said people should not panic because the EPA had told the county the spill would not harm people and that the primary pollutants were iron and zinc.

"It's not going to look pretty, but it's not a killer," Cooper told The (Farmington) Daily Times.

The impact on wildlife wasn't clear. There are no fish in the Cement Creek watershed because of longstanding problems with water quality, the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment said.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife was placing cages containing fish in the Animas River to monitor what happens to them, spokesman Joe Lewandowski said.

"We'll see if those fish survive," Lewandowski said. "We're also monitoring to make sure we don't get infiltration into the hatchery, because that could be a problem."

[ALSO: The Best of Data Mine 2014]

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife office in suburban Denver did not immediately return a call asking about the spill.

Durango resident Lisa Shaefer said she was near the mine Wednesday when a mine bulwark broke and sent a torrent of water downstream that raised the water level 2 to 3 feet in Cement Creek. The initial wall of water carried rocks and debris and made a roar as it pushed through a culvert, she said.

"What came down was the filthiest yellow mustard water you've ever seen," she told the newspaper.

___

Information from: KIQX-FM, http://www.radiodurango.com
</blockquote>
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Offline zeker

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spill was predicted?? forecast?
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2015, 05:46:16 AM »
Full Letter to the Editor Warning of EPA Mine Waste Water Blowout contaminating the Animas, San Juan, Colorado River Systems 6 days before EventThe Release of Mine Water filled with Heavy Metals into
the Animas, San Jaun ,Colorado River Systems that flow into Lake Mead was predicted and warned of in a Letter to the Editor dated July 30, 2015


This is Public Domain, as a Letter to the Editor in a NEWS paper it is NOT protected under COPYRIGHT LAW, Under the 1st Amendment to the USA Constitution.

I would site the Newspaper but since it was not part of the picture the News Paper was posted from, I can not.
If anyone can verify what paper this was printed in, please post this information.

 [link to oi60.tinypic.com]
Page 10-Thursday, July 30, 2015

EPA plan is really a 'Superfund blitzkrieg'
Editor;
I came to Silverton this summer
to enjoy my retirement, appreciate
nature and prospect the moun-
tains for unique minerals. I came
here to enjoy a simple life with no
TV and no politics, but unfortu-
nately that has changed. Your EPA
delimma has caused my blood to
boil.
Based on my 47 years of expe-
rience as a professional geologist,
it appears to me that the EPA is
setting your town and the area up
for a possible Superfund blitzkrieg.
In regards to your meeting
with the EPA on June 23, Mr.
Hestmark's (EPA represntative)
statement "we don't have an
agenda" is either ignorant naivety
or an outright falsehood. I am
certain Mr. Hestmark's hydrol-
ologists have advised him what's
going to happen when the Red &
Bonita portals and plugged and
the "grand experiment" begins
with unknown and foreseeable
results and possible negative con-
sequences.
Here's the scenario that will
occur based on my experience:
Following the plugging, the
exfiltrating water will be retained
behind the bulkheads, accumu-
lating at a rate of approximately
500 gallons per minute. As the
water backs up, it will begin filling
all connected mine workings and
bedrock voids and fractures. As
the water level inside the workings
continues to rise, it will accumu-
late head preasure at a rate of 1
PSI per each 2.31 feet of vertical
rise. As the water continues to
migrate through the fill intercon-
nected workings, the preasure will
increase. Eventually, without a
doubt. The water will find a way
out and will exfiltrate uncontrol-
lably through connected aband-
doned shafts, drifts, raises, frac-
tures and possibly from talus on
the hillside. Initially it will appear
that the miracle fix is working.
"Hallelujah!"
But make no mistake, with in
seven to 120 days all of the 500
gmp flow will return to Cement
Creek. Contamination will actu-
ally increase do to disturbance
and flusing action within the
workings.
The "grand experiment" in my
opinion will fail. And guess what
Mr. Hestmark will say then?
Gee, "Plan A" didn't work so I
guess we will have to build a treat-
ment plant at a cost to taxpayers
of $100 million to $500 million
(who knows).
Reading between the lines, I be-
lieve that has been the EPA's plan
all along. The proposed Red and Bo-
nita plugging plan hs been their
way of getting a foot in the door
to justify their hidden agenda for
construction of a treatment plant.
After all, with a budget of $8.2
billions and 17,000 employees,
the EPA needs new, big projects
to feed and best and justify their
existance.
I would recommend that any-
one who owns a home, prop-
erty water well or spring in the
Cement Creek drainage take water
samples ASAP to protect them-
selves from groundwater changes
that may be caused by the EPA
plugging operation!
God Bless America! God bless
Silverton, Colorado. And God
protect us from the EPA.
--Dave Taylor, Farmington
of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most

Offline zeker

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lead and arsenic
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2015, 05:56:42 AM »


One of the samples of mercury was nearly 10 times higher than the EPA acceptable levels. Samples of beryllium and cadmium were 33 times higher, and one of the arsenic levels was more than 800 times higher.

 [link to www.cnn.com
...................... .................................. .....................................................
 
 
 
mercury is used extensively for gold extraction.. this mine was a gold mine for many yrs.
 
at first it was said 1 million gal.. now its 3-4 million..
 
incompetance and arrogance caused this spill.
 
was reading that it was heading for lake mead and lake powell.. thats quite a distance, if true. 126 miles to lake powell.
 
even with dilution, lake mead is at all time lows, and millions of folks depend on it for water.
 
water that is scarce supply in the drought.
 
so now they pollute the remaining water, because the drought wasnt bringing down the real estate prices fast enuf?
 
 
« Last Edit: August 12, 2015, 05:58:18 AM by zeker »
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Offline zeker

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bingo
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2015, 06:00:11 AM »
Look for the next headline
 
"EPA to raise acceptable levels of mercury and arsenic - avoids major mishap."
 
 :o
of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most

Offline zeker

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of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most