Author Topic: house to house for ebola  (Read 1474 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline zeker

  • Pro Prepper
  • *****
  • Posts: 3519
  • Karma: 28
  • Country: Canada
  • Location: N Ont
house to house for ebola
« on: August 02, 2014, 06:37:43 AM »
link to www.ohio.com]
 
Ebola outbreak tops 700 deaths                                                               By Clarence Roy-Macadulay
                                                                Associated PressServices    </body>             Published: July 31, 2014 - 01:36 PM                       ebola01cut                                  Social Commentator Alfred Sirleaf,  gives comment on current events in Liberia including the deadly Ebola virus by speaking and writhing them down on a blackboard in Monrovia, Liberia, Thursday. The worst recorded Ebola outbreak in history surpassed 700 deaths in West Africa as the World Health Organization on Thursday announced dozens of new fatalities. (AP Photo/Jonathan Paye-Layleh)                View Larger Version >>Ebola outbreak tops 700 deathsAugust 01,2014 01:51 AM GMTClarence Roy-MacadulayAssociated Press Copyright � 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published,broadcast, rewritten or redistributed..FREETOWN, SIERRA LEONE: The death toll from the worst recorded Ebola outbreak in history surpassed 700 in West Africa as security forces went house to house in Sierra Leone’s capital Thursday looking for patients and others exposed to the disease.
Fears grew as the United States warned against travel to the three infected countries — Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia — and Sierra Leone’s soccer team was blocked from boarding a plane in Nairobi, Kenya, that was to take them to the Seychelles for a game on Saturday. Airport authorities in Kenya said Seychelles immigration told them to prevent the team from traveling.
Almost half of the 57 new deaths reported by the World Health Organization occurred in Liberia, where two Americans, Dr. Kent Brantly of Texas and Nancy Writebol, a North Carolina-based missionary, are also sick with Ebola.
White House press secretary Josh Earnest said the U.S. is looking into options to bring them back to the U.S. Officials at Atlanta’s Emory University Hospital said they expected one of the Americans to be transferred there “within the next several days.”
Writebol is in stable but serious condition and is receiving an experimental treatment that doctors hope will better address her condition, according to a statement released by SIM, a Christian missions organization. Her husband, David, is close by but can only visit his wife through a window or dressed in a hazardous materials suit, the statement said.
There is no licensed drug or vaccine for Ebola, and patients can only be given supportive care to keep them hydrated. There are a handful of experimental drug and vaccine candidates for Ebola and while some have had promising results in animals including monkeys, none has been rigorously tested in humans.
The disease has continued to spread through bodily fluids as sick people remain out in the community and cared for by relatives without protective gear. People have become ill from touching sick family members and in some cases from soiled linens.
In Sierra Leone, which borders Liberia to the northwest, authorities are vowing to quarantine all those at home who have refused to go to isolation centers. Many families have kept relatives at home to pray for their survival instead of bringing them to clinics that have had a 60 percent fatality rate. Those in the throngs of death can bleed from their eyes, mouth and ears.
Rosa Crestani, Ebola emergency coordinator for Doctors Without Borders, said it is “crucial” at this point to gain the trust of communities that have been afraid to let health workers in and to deploy more medical staff.
Liberia’s president on Wednesday also instituted new measures aimed at halting the spread of Ebola, including shutting down schools and ordering most public servants to stay home from work.
“It could be helpful for the government to have powers to isolate and quarantine people and it’s certainly better than what’s been done so far,” said Dr. Heinz Feldmann, chief of virology at U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “Whether it works, we will have to wait and see.”
Dr. Unni Krishnan, head of disaster preparedness and response for the aid group Plan International, said closing schools could help as they bring large numbers of children together, which can amplify infection rates.
“Door-to-door searches are not going to be easy,” he said. “What will help is encouraging people to come forward when they see symptoms and seek medical help.”
The U.S. Peace Corps also was evacuating hundreds of its volunteers in the affected countries.
Two Peace Corps workers are under isolation outside the U.S. after having contact with a person who later died from the Ebola virus, a State Department official said.
The last time the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued such a travel warning during a disease outbreak was in 2003 because of SARS in Asia.
Ebola now has been blamed for 729 deaths in four West African countries this year: 339 in Guinea, 233 in Sierra Leone, 156 in Liberia and one in Nigeria.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2014, 06:39:13 AM by zeker »
of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most

Offline zeker

  • Pro Prepper
  • *****
  • Posts: 3519
  • Karma: 28
  • Country: Canada
  • Location: N Ont
Re: in canada now?
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2014, 10:56:46 AM »
of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most

Offline zeker

  • Pro Prepper
  • *****
  • Posts: 3519
  • Karma: 28
  • Country: Canada
  • Location: N Ont
some tips
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2014, 06:32:29 AM »
1-Standard Tyvek suits are not effective against ebola. They are micro-porus and cannot be decontaminated or washed. DO NOT USE STANDARD TYVEK! A coated tyvek suit (a plastic film laminated tyvek ) is the only barrier that will stop ebola, or at least not allow it to pass through during decontamination. Such effective suits are known as chemical protective suits. Affordable lines of them are Tychem QC, Tychem SL, Dupont CPF I, II or III, etc. Even affordable suits are $10 each, at a minimum. These suits *can* be worn more than once, provided the exposure was limited AND a thorough decontamination was performed, but you will at best only get a few uses out of them.

2-Bio-protective PPE is only durable for a lab environment. Even rubbing against something like furniture or a door frame can abrade the suit enough to allow contamination to pass through. Kneeling is strictly frowned upon, as contaminates can be pressed through the material, or embedded enough to be missed during contamination.

3-In cases like this, the person performing decontamination MUST be in full protection, as well. A small splash while performing decon is just as dangerous as a small splash from a direct exposure. The person performing decontamination must also be trained and experienced. Even trained and experienced people become complacent; I see it all the time. I have marked suits with a concoction that shows up under UV light during training. At the end of the day I revealed this fact to the participants and shocked them when they discovered nearly all of them were glowing head-to-toe.

4-After nearly two weeks of endless investigation on effective decontaminants / disinfectants, the only agents that are looking to be effective are bleach (1:10 for direct contact and splashes / spills / etc, and 1:100 for general area disinfection), alcohol IMMERSION for instruments (not spray or wipe, as alcohol evaporates faster than the kill time on the virus.) Chlorine dioxide and formaldehyde are also effective, but unlikely to be used by anyone here and need special PPE to employ such agents. Most other disinfectants (quaternary ammonium agents, benzalkonium chloride,lysol, etc.) are not effective!

5-Cold will not deactivate ebola. At all. The virus remains viable indefinitely in the cold- even in cryogenic temperatures. Heat will kill it, though.
of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most

Offline zeker

  • Pro Prepper
  • *****
  • Posts: 3519
  • Karma: 28
  • Country: Canada
  • Location: N Ont
airborne?
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2014, 06:35:15 AM »
of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most

Offline zeker

  • Pro Prepper
  • *****
  • Posts: 3519
  • Karma: 28
  • Country: Canada
  • Location: N Ont
unescorted ambulance?
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2014, 07:23:17 AM »
seems pretty strange that if this being such a GREAT THREAT they would have the ambulance just casually driving around town. car accidents happen all the time.
and. isnt standard protocol, to have patient on stretcher? after all.. he was at deaths door cpl days ago? or. he be death incarnated. did pilot have full suit on? who else was on plane? wouldnt an airborne virus spread thruoghout the line of travel via vehicle? everytime a door to the ambulance was open or closed it would let out a gush of air.
 
and at some point he had to be outside his suit to get it on. and now he is walking into a hospital.
 
perhaps it was not him.. masquerade? slite of hand. and why bring him back if he was such a threat?  ie. virus capable of killing millions. they wouldnt drive around with an unescorted nuke.
 
just thinking out loud. here
of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most

Offline zeker

  • Pro Prepper
  • *****
  • Posts: 3519
  • Karma: 28
  • Country: Canada
  • Location: N Ont
CDC airline advisory
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2014, 08:09:55 AM »
 CDCQuarantine and IsolationAirline GuidanceManaging Ill Passengers/CrewEbola Guidance for AirlinesShareShareCompartirInterim Guidance about Ebola Virus Infection for Airline Flight Crews, Cleaning Personnel, and Cargo PersonnelOverview of Ebola Virus DiseaseEbola virus disease (also known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever) is a severe, often-fatal disease caused by infection with a species of Ebola virus. Although the disease is rare, it can spread from person to person, especially among health care staff and other people who have close contact* with an infected person. Ebola is spread through direct contact with blood or body fluids (such as saliva or urine) of an infected person or animal or through contact with objects that have been contaminated with the blood or other body fluids of an infected person.
The likelihood of contracting Ebola is extremely low unless a person has direct contact with the body fluids of a person or animal that is infected and showing symptoms. A fever in a person who has traveled to or lived in an area where Ebola is present is likely to be caused by a more common infectious disease, but the person would need to be evaluated by a health care provider to be sure.
The incubation period, from exposure to when signs or symptoms appear, for Ebola ranges from 2 to 21 days (most commonly 8-10 days). Early symptoms include sudden fever, chills, and muscle aches. Around the fifth day, a skin rash can occur. Nausea, vomiting, chest pain, sore throat, abdominal pain, and diarrhea may follow. Symptoms become increasingly severe and may include jaundice (yellow skin), severe weight loss, mental confusion, bleeding inside and outside the body, shock, and multi-organ failure.
The prevention of Ebola virus infection includes measures to avoid contact with blood and body fluids of infected individuals and with objects contaminated with these fluids (e.g., syringes).Stopping ill travelers from boarding aircraftPeople who have been exposed to Ebola virus disease should not travel on commercial airplanes until there is a period of monitoring for symptoms of illness lasting 21 days after exposure. Sick travelers should delay travel until cleared to travel by a doctor or public health authority.
Airlines should consider using their own authority (for US airlines, Federal Register[PDF - 74 pages], Department of Transportation 14 CFR Part 382) to deny boarding of sick travelers if Ebola is suspected.Management of ill people on aircraft if Ebola virus is suspectedCrew members on a flight with a passenger or other crew member who is ill with a fever, jaundice, or bleeding and who is traveling from or has recently been in a risk area should follow these precautions:
  • Keep the sick person separated from others as much as possible.
  • Provide the sick person with a surgical mask (if the sick person can tolerate wearing one) to reduce the number of droplets expelled into the air by talking, sneezing, or coughing.
  • Give tissues to a sick person who cannot tolerate a mask. Provide a plastic bag for disposing of used tissues.
  • Wear impermeable disposable gloves for direct contact with blood or other body fluids.
Universal Precaution Kits: Airplanes traveling to countries affected with Ebola should carry Universal Precaution Kits, as recommended by the International Civil Aviation Organization[PDF - 30 pages] (ICAO), for managing ill onboard passengers.
Visit CDC's Infection Control Guidelines for Cabin Crew Members on Commercial Aircraft for more information on practical measures cabin crew members can take to protect themselves, passengers and other crew members.Reporting Ill TravelersThe captain of an aircraft bound for the United States is required by law to report to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) before arrival any deaths onboard or ill travelers who meet specified criteria. This is consistent with mandatory reporting standards of ICAO (ICAO document 4444 and Annex 9, Ch. 8, of the Chicago Convention).
CDC staff can be consulted to assist in evaluating an ill traveler, provide recommendations, and answer questions about reporting requirements; however, reporting to CDC does not replace usual company procedures for in-flight medical consultation or obtaining medical assistance.General Infection Control PrecautionsPersonnel should always follow basic infection control precautions to protect against any type of infectious disease.What to do if you think you have been exposedAny person who thinks he or she has been exposed to Ebola virus either through travel, assisting an ill traveler, handling a contaminated object, or cleaning a contaminated aircraft should take the following precautions:
  • Notify your employer immediately.
  • Monitor your health for 21 days. Watch for fever (temperature of 101°F/38.3°C or higher), chills, muscle aches, severe diarrhea, vomiting, rash, and other symptoms consistent with Ebola.
When to see a health care provider
  • If you develop sudden fever, chills, muscle aches, severe diarrhea, vomiting, rash, or other symptoms consistent with Ebola, you should seek immediate medical attention.
    • Before visiting a health care provider, alert the clinic or emergency room in advance about your possible exposure to Ebola virus so that arrangements can be made to prevent spreading it to others.
    • When traveling to a health care provider, limit contact with other people. Avoid all other travel.
  • If you are located abroad, contact your employer for help with locating a health care provider. The U.S. embassy or consulate in the country where you are located can also provide names and addresses of local physicians.
Guidance for Airline Cleaning PersonnelEbola virus is transmitted by close contact* with a person who has symptoms of Ebola. Treat any body fluid as though it is infectious. Blood or body fluids on interior surfaces can spread Ebola if they get into your eyes, nose, or mouth. Therefore, hand hygiene is the most important infection control measure. Wear disposable impermeable gloves when cleaning visibly contaminated surfaces.
For any ill traveler on board an aircraft, even if Ebola is not considered, the the airline's ground and cleaning crews should be notified so that preparations can be made to clean the aircraft after passengers have disembarked. When cleaning aircraft after a flight with a patient who may have had Ebola, personnel should follow these precautions:
  • Wear impermeable disposable gloves while cleaning the passenger cabin and lavatories.
  • Wipe down lavatory surfaces and frequently touched surfaces in the passenger cabin, such as armrests, seat backs, tray tables, light and air controls, and adjacent walls and windows with an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered cleaner/disinfectant that has been tested and approved for use by the airplane manufacturers.
  • Special cleaning of upholstery, carpets, or storage compartments is not indicated unless they are obviously soiled with blood or body fluids.
  • Special vacuuming equipment or procedures are not necessary.
  • Do not use compressed air, which might spread infectious material through the air.
  • If a seat cover or carpet is obviously soiled with blood or body fluids, it should be removed and discarded by the methods used for biohazardous material.
  • Throw used gloves away according to the company's recommended infection control precautions when cleaning is done or if they become soiled or damaged during cleaning.
  • Clean hands with soap and water (or waterless alcohol-based hand sanitizer when soap is not available) immediately after gloves are removed.
Guidance for Air Cargo PersonnelPackages should not pose a risk. Ebola virus is spread through direct contact with blood or body fluids (such as urine or saliva) from an infected person.
  • Packages visibly soiled with blood or body fluids should not be handled.
  • Cargo handlers should wash their hands often to prevent other infectious diseases.
* Close contact is defined as having cared for or lived with a person with Ebola or having a high likelihood of direct contact with blood or body fluids of an Ebola patient. Examples of close contact include kissing or embracing, sharing eating or drinking utensils, close conversation (<3 feet), physical examination, and any other direct physical contact between people. Close contact does not include walking by a person or briefly sitting across a room from a person.Additional InformationRelated Links
  • Page last reviewed: August 2, 2014
« Last Edit: August 03, 2014, 08:13:18 AM by zeker »
of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most