Author Topic: iceland activity  (Read 1944 times)

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Offline zeker

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iceland activity
« on: July 08, 2014, 07:33:53 AM »
Skip to content← Ongoing earthquake activity in Katla volcanoUpdate at 21:27 UTC on earthquake activity in Katla volcanoPosted on July 7, 2014 by Jón FrímannSend to KindleThis is a short update on what is now taking place in Katla volcano. This information might go outdated quickly after it is being written.
Currently the earthquake activity in Katla volcano is increasing. However there are no signs of imminent eruption as is. However that might change without notice under my current estimate. It is impossible to know if this activity in Katla volcano is going to continue to increase or slow down again. It is my estimate that activity in Katla volcano is going to continue to increase (based on past experience) before it quiets down again. That might not result in a eruption, since this type of activity does not mean that an eruption is going to take place. This activity in Katla volcano has increased that risk at current time and until this earthquake activity stops or gets to lower levels, that risk is going to remain higher then normal. As things stand now there are no signs of that an eruption is going to take place in Katla volcano.
140707_2017
The earthquake activity in Katla volcano during the past 48 hours. Copyright of this image belongs to Icelandic Meteorological Office.
During the minor eruption in Katla volcano in July-2011 (I wrote about it here and here) a minor earthquake swarm like this was also detected in Katla volcano. Back then as now it did start about one month earlier before the minor eruption took place. That activity took place in different part of the caldera then the activity that is now taking place. Today the activity in Katla volcano is the area that might have erupted during the 1918 eruption in Katla volcano (I think).
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The magnitude 3,0 earthquake in Katla volcano yesterday. This image is under Creative Commons licence. Please see CC Licence page for more details.
This earthquake clearly shows the sign of magma under pressure creating a earthquake. This is a possibly a tornillo event. Since it is a low frequency, monochromatic and with long tale in it’s end. I don’t know what is going to happen next in Katla volcano, if anything happens at all other then just this earthquake activity. More water has been reported in Múlakvísl along with higher conductivity taking place, that however might just be rain water in the area since it has been experiencing heavy rain for the past few days. I am going to continue to watch the activity in Katla volcano.
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Offline zeker

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Re: iceland activity
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2014, 07:37:24 AM »
Iceland’s Katla Volcano: Long Term Effects if Katla Erupts        October 18, 2011 10:12 AM EST        If Iceland's Katla Volcano awakens from slumber and erupts, Icelanders and air travelers won't be the only ones affected. Eruptions from large volcanoes have wreaked havoc on Earth's ecosystem by lowering temperatures and thinning the ozone layer.   <ins><ins><ins></ins></ins></ins>
Katla is a much bigger volcano than Eyjafjallajokull which spewed ash all over Europe for several weeks and grounded air travel across Northern Europe. The potential for a global disaster should Katla erupt is higher than Eyjafjallajokull. Gases released in a major eruption can cause increased coughing and eye and skin irritation that can lead to serious lung conditions. Ash which has sharp, jagged edges microscopically can get into lungs and airways and cause health conditions. 
Another global effect of a volcanic eruption is a cool down in temperatures. Sulfur released from volcanic eruptions can cool the Earth. Sulfur can form sulfuric acid droplets than can block the sunlight hitting the Earth. These sulfur infused droplets can stay in the atmosphere for a year. Another Iceland volcano, Laki erupted in 1783 and caused extreme weather in Europe and contributed to a rise in respiratory diseases. If Katla erupts it can cause temperatures to lower worldwide. An eruption of Katla's magnitude could unintentionally have positive effects such as slowing global warming.
Volcanic eruptions can also lead to acid rain if the acid coating on volcanic ash is removed by rain. Acid rain can pollute local water supplies and cause damage to vegetation. Livestock will also be affected if they eat or digest ash, causing another massive livestock die-off like the one in 1918 when Katla erupted.
For now experts are still monitoring the situation with Katla. Iceland's Meteorological Office has warned the public not to panic.
"There are presently no measurable signs that an eruption of Katla is imminent; however, given the heightened levels of seismicity, the situation might change abruptly," the office said in a statement on its website.
Katla erupted almost a century ago. The volcano averages two eruptions every 100 years raising fears that another one is about to hit.
To contact the editor, e-mail: Iceland’s Katla Volcano: Long Term Effects if Katla Erupts&body=%0A%0Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fau.ibtimes.com%2Farticles%2F232810%2F20111018%2Ficeland-katla-volcano-eruption-eyjafjallajokull-damage.htm]editor@ibtimes.com
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Offline zeker

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Re: iceland activity
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2014, 06:33:58 AM »
The Times: Iceland prepares for second, devastating volcanic eruption that would cause "Global damage" Iceland is preparing for an even more powerful and potentially destructive volcano after a small eruption at the weekend shot red-hot molten lava high into the sky.

About 500 people were safely evacuated from the land close to the Eyjafjallajokull volcano, which is around 120 kilometres (75 miles) southeast of the capital, Reykjavik. The country's two airports were closed for most of the day and transatlantic flights re-routed to avoid the risk of ash blocking visibility and destroying engines.

After circling the spectacular eruption in a Civil Defence aircraft, Freymodur Sigmundsson, a geophysicist, concluded that the immediate danger was receding and that the lava was flowing along a one kilometre-long fissure.

The original fear was that the volcano had erupted directly underneath the Eyjafjallajokull glacier, which could have caused glacial melt, flooding and mudslides. Instead, the volcano blew inbetween Eyjafjallajokull and the larger Myrdalsjoekull glacier.


However, the danger is that the small volcano is just the beginning and that it will trigger the far more powerful volcano of Katla, which nestles beneath Myrdalsjoekull.


“That has to be on the table at the moment,"
Dave McGarvie, senior lecturer at the Volcano Dynamics Group of the Open University, said. “And it is a much nastier piece of work.”

Icelanders agree. "This could trigger Katla, which is a vicious volcano that could cause both local and global damage," Pall Einarsson, from the University of Iceland, said.

Tremors around Eyjafjallajokull were first recorded in early March, but precise prediction of volcanic eruption is difficult, even with the high-tech equipment available to Icelandic geologists.

Now that it has happened the only basis for prediction is history — and that does not look good.

"Eyjafjallajokull has blown three times in the past thousand years," Dr McGarvie told The Times, "in 920AD, in 1612 and between 1821 and 1823. Each time it set off Katla." The likelihood of Katla blowing could become clear "in a few weeks or a few months", he said.

Iceland is built on a volcanic rock on the Atlantic's mid-oceanic ridge and it has grown used to eruptions. The southern village of Vik, close to the current eruption, has for centuries had an escape plan in which everybody runs up to the church, which is built on high ground. They know that if Katla erupts flooding will follow.

The island's worst eruption in modern times was in 1783, when the Laki volcano blew its top. The lava shot to heights of 1.4 kilometres and more than 120 million tonnes of sulphur dioxide was released into the atmosphere.


A quarter of the island's population died in the resulting famine and it transformed the world, creating Britain's notorious "sand summer", casting a toxic cloud over Prague, playing havoc with harvests in France — sometimes seen as a contributory factor in the French Revolution — and changing the climate so dramatically that New Jersey recorded its largest snowfall and Egypt one of its most enduring droughts.

 [link to www.timesonline.co.uk]
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Offline zeker

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eruption??
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2014, 11:02:14 AM »

Iceland raises aviation code for Bardarbunga volcano to red, indicating some eruption - @AP
End of alert
 
trying to find linx but most cams are out
   [link to www.ruv.is]


From link...

Small eruption has begun at the crack northeast of Bárðarbunga in Dyngjujökli, says Kristin Jonsdottir, with the Meteorological Institute. Air traffic over a wide area around Bárðarbunga has been banned: The IMO has amended its warning in red. Dyke is 25 km. lengthy and increased functionality has been there.
 
« Last Edit: August 23, 2014, 11:04:59 AM by zeker »
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Offline zeker

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bardarbunga
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2014, 11:30:14 AM »
Iceland issues Bardarbunga volcano red alert Warning sign on the road to the Bardarbunga volcano (20 August) On Wednesday several hundred people were evacuated from the volcano area  Continue reading the main story Related Stories Iceland has issued a red alert to the aviation industry for the Bardarbunga volcano, meaning significant ash emissions are likely.
The Icelandic Met Office has warned that a small sub-glacial eruption is under way at Bardarbunga.
On Wednesday, authorities evacuated an area close to the volcano over fears it could erupt.
Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano erupted in 2010, producing an ash cloud that severely disrupted air travel.
The red alert is the highest warning on the country's five-point scale.
Bardarbunga is part of a large volcano system hidden beneath the 500-metre (0.31-mile) thick Vatnajokull glacier in central Iceland.
Authorities have previously warned that any eruption in the volcano, which sits under an ice cap, could result in flooding of the area north of the glacier.
Wednesday's evacuation of several hundred people from the area came after geologists said about 300 earthquakes had been detected in the area since midnight on Tuesday.
The region, located more than 300km (190 miles) from the capital Reykjavik, has no permanent residents but sits within a national park popular with tourists.
The Eyjafjallajokull eruption in April 2010 caused the largest closure of European airspace since World War Two, with losses estimated at between 1.5bn and 2.5bn euros (£1.3-2.2bn).
Criticism following the strictly enforced shutdown resulted in the UK's Civil Aviation Authority relaxing its rules to allow planes to fly in areas with a low density of volcanic ash.
of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most