Author Topic: Fast-Spreading Bird Flu Causes Panic in China  (Read 823 times)

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Offline kelee877

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Fast-Spreading Bird Flu Causes Panic in China
« on: February 12, 2014, 04:28:53 AM »
Several influenza viruses, including bird flu and swine flu, that have rapidly spread to eight Chinese provinces, including the two municipalities Beijing and Shanghai, are steadily gaining pace from day to day and causing national panic. At least 181 human cases of influenza viruses with 38 fatalities have been confirmed since January, according to data compiled from reports by local authorities.

As of Feb. 9, 179 cases of H7N9 bird flu have been reported with 37 fatalities, alongside one fatal case of H1N1 swine flu and one case of H10N8 bird flu. The 179 recorded cases in first 40 days of this year has surpassed China’s official total number of 146 cases of H7N9 in 2013, which included 45 fatalities.


H7N9 SpreadThe first recognized case of H7N9 human infection emerged in east China last March. The virus re-emerged in October and has rapidly spread since January, primarily in southeast China. According to China’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), on average, five to seven cases of H7N9 are reported daily, with numbers increasing. Zhejiang Province has reported the most cases–77 cases with 12 deaths have been confirmed. Li Lanjuan, professor and chief physician at the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine predicts a large rise in infections this winter. “The H7N9 flu virus is known to be more active in the winter.



There will be an increasing number of cases in the coming months in Zhejiang, even bigger than the cases being reported,” Li was quoted by [size=inherit]Zhejiang News Online.[/size]According to the Geneva-based [size=inherit]World Health Organization [/size](WHO), as of Jan. 28, the case fatality rate of all confirmed cases in 13 provinces and municipalities in east China, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region of China), and Taipei CDC is 22 percent, but many cases are still hospitalized.PanicAs the H7N9 death toll rises, there has been growing panic among the public.“Everyone is now panicking over the bird flu,” said Shen Jianmin, a resident in Zhejiang.



“Worried about a deadly influenza pandemic, people wear masks and don’t eat poultry or meat.”Among the 37 confirmed fatalities is a 31-year-old surgeon from the Shanghai Pudong New Area People’s Hospital. His death from the bird flu was identified on Jan. 18, with the source of infection unknown.Shanghai resident Ms. Li told Epoch Times: “Even the doctor as a patient couldn’t be treated successfully, to say nothing of ordinary people.” Ms. Li was also doubtful about the accuracy of reported fatalities. “The government has definitely not reported the real death toll,” Li said. “Now all the major hospitals in Shanghai are full of patients with flu-like symptoms. We’re really scared of the spread of bird flu, even not daring to go to a hospital for treatment of minor illnesses,” she added.


A female doctor at the hospital where the surgeon died, speaking on condition of anonymity, said: “Because the H7N9 virus is more transmissible and harder to detect than H5N1 bird flu, we doctors even fear the prospect of human-to-human transmission of this virus.” Mr. Ye, a resident from Guangdong, the province with the second most cases–60 with 13 deaths have been recorded since August of last year, told Epoch Times: “Increased cases of the bird flu raise concerns about the potential of more widespread infections and transmission to humans. So live chicken sales are banned here and even restaurants have removed chicken dishes from their menus.”Beijing resident Mr. Yuan told Epoch Times that people are scared at the mere mention of the bird flu.


They don’t even dare to eat chicken and eggs, and try to stay home for fear of getting bird flu, he said. Multiple cases of family cluster infections have also been reported, indicating human-to-human transmission.


If the virus mutates into a form that can directly pass between humans, it could result in the disease spreading rapidly, causing global epidemics, according to Chen Taoan, former director of the Information Division of Shanxi’s CDC.http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/500416-fast-spreading-bird-flu-causes-panic-in-china/?sidebar=todaysheadline
« Last Edit: February 12, 2014, 04:46:58 AM by kelee877 »
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