Author Topic: Alternative heat source in winter  (Read 1998 times)

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Offline livingpower

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Alternative heat source in winter
« on: October 10, 2014, 09:11:19 AM »
I live smack dab in the city, rent my home, and would but up the creek if we lost power for an extended period of time in the winter (which almost happened last year).  I am looking at an indoor propane heater.  These are the options I am looking at:


http://www.homedepot.ca/product/mh200cv-convection-propane-75000-200000-btu-hr/809899


or this:


http://www.homedepot.ca/product/mh200cv-convection-propane-75000-200000-btu-hr/809899


In terms of price, I prefer the first option.  They say they are for use in workshops, construction sites, etc., but would they also be safe in a home?  Opinions/advice welcome.

Offline Malark21

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Re: Alternative heat source in winter
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2014, 09:46:05 AM »
Thats a lot of BTU for a house. Don't get me wrong if you have a large home and need to heat every square inch of it to super warm temperature then it may be the way to go. 29 Hours for 100lbs of Propane may not be what you need. Thats less then 6 hours per bbq tank. I like this http://www.homedepot.com/p/Dyna-Glo-18-000-BTU-Propane-Cabinet-Gas-Portable-Heater-RA18LPDG/204267430 Won't do the entire house super fast but will put in a good effort. It is vague on where you can use it but multiple people talk about it inside their livingroom etc. in the reviews. However as you rent out and it may be a larger size, an industrial heater may be the way to go. Just be prepared to stock up on a lot of propane. Depends I suppose if you want to maintain identical heat levels for a short period of time say 24 hours before they fix the problem or if you want to be able to moderatly heat for a week. Enough to keep pipes from freezing and freezing to death in your sleep lol. I have a 2200sqft home in a quasi urban setting but am still looking at the smaller one because I know their are areas I dont have to worry about heating and I can wear sweaters. If I can maintain 50-55 degrees we will survive just fine and pipes wont burst on me. My 2 cents anyways. Let me know what you get because I am always curious to see actual heating amounts to BTU as opposed to whats listed on their description. I find alot of BTU to space rating can change dramatically dependent on insulation. Good Windows. Etc. In prolonged periods of living off of a small alternate heat source I recommend those plastic covers from the dollar store you can shrink rap over windows.
You do not draw your sword to fight the darkness, you light a candle...

Offline Malark21

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Re: Alternative heat source in winter
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2014, 09:48:10 AM »
Sorry just realized I need to work on paragraphing/spacing...
You do not draw your sword to fight the darkness, you light a candle...

Offline livingpower

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Re: Alternative heat source in winter
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2014, 09:57:24 AM »
Thanks, Malark!  The one you indicated looks perfect.  If we really need to hunker down for a shorter or longer period with no heat, then we will keep to the dining room and kitchen.  I can close these two rooms off from the rest of the house and the downstairs bathroom is also in that are.  This looks like the perfect solution to heating that smaller area.  Plus, it's less expensive  ;)

Offline Greenguy

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Re: Alternative heat source in winter
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2014, 09:59:20 AM »
Hi LP,
I'm no expert in this field, but I believe the heaters you are looking at are designed for very large area heating in spaces that are not air tight.  They would give off a lot of heat, but also a lot of fumes.  Moreover, the first unit requires AC electricity to run the blower.   
My suggestion:
First, decide what room(s) you need to heat in the event of an emergency, because you can't heat them all.  Look at the size of the rooms (in square ft). 
Then Pick a heater that fits that size without significantly over-sizing it.  A heater running at 100% output will be more efficient (less fumes and more output for the gas used) than a heater running at 25% output.  Look at heaters that are either "radiant" (without AC blower motors), or ones that can work with or without blowers.
Personally, I like either the "Buddy" or "Big Buddy" here:
http://www.heater.com/tlw1035/mr-heater/mr-heater-portable-buddy-heater.html

http://www.heater.com/tlw1036/mr-heater/mr-heater-big-buddy-heater.html

These little guys were designed to be used indoors.  They have automatic low O2 shut downs, can run on the small 1lb or larger 20 lb propane tanks (with an additional adapter hose), can use AC or battery power, etc...

My 2 cents.

Offline GrouchyPrepper

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Re: Alternative heat source in winter
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2014, 06:18:25 PM »
you might want to watch this vid on heating.   ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=weLWOMAXV2Y&list=UUO8MQqy42F8B9Lnk7iQvp1A