Author Topic: beekeeping  (Read 1000 times)

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Offline Henry

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beekeeping
« on: February 23, 2016, 08:39:41 AM »
Anybody in this group into beekeeping ?
Like to exchange some ideas and have all kinds of books on beekeeping.
Henry



Offline hayseed

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Re: beekeeping
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2016, 07:14:32 AM »
I have bees. I am kind of hands off in my management style.

Offline Henry

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Re: beekeeping
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2016, 07:59:29 PM »
I am not real expert ether, but it is nice hobby and honey is excellent food source and in case of disaster good exchange or for sale
Lucky me that here in my area (Huntsville) there is not any farming so my bees are not getting poisoned as much as in southern Ont.
For me it is still learning process.
Henry

Offline hayseed

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Re: beekeeping
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2016, 04:53:32 PM »
I took a course which included my my first nuc three years ago. Since then I have been going off the rails in terms of what I was taught.


I am using modified langstroth hives. I use foundationless frames so that I don't need a honey extractor and the bees can build what ever size cells they think is needed. I don't care if they swarm so I only check a hive if I don't see some decent activity going on. Bees are like chickens and ducks; they are fun to watch so I usually notice if something isn't right.


I put an extra, medium super, on the hive in the late fall and put a piece of roxul insulation in it, leaving a 1-2" space between the roxul and the hive roof. This takes care of moisture problems during the winter. 


I cut the winter insulated bee hive wrap down the seam and use tuck tape to put it back together when wrapping the hive. This way, when we get warm weather in the middle of January, I can cut the tape and remove the wrap and put it back on when the temperatures drop again, without a lot of hassle trying to slide a tight tube over a rectangular box.


I do not treat my bees for any thing which is why I expect higher losses for a few years. I figure the best way to solve the mite problem is to let the bees and mites breed and find a balance they can both live with. It works in China and Africa so it will eventually work here given a chance.



To me, it seems silly to take all of their honey and feed them sugar water in the spring to keep them going until the plants bloom. I take my honey in the spring when they don't need it any more and can make fresh honey for themselves. My goal is to have 10 hives. That leaves me with 5 if I lose 50% on a bad year. 5 hives should produce enough honey for themselves, new splits and for me. If I don't lose so many hives, then there would be honey to sell.


I lost one hive last summer; but the two remaining hives are still alive and kicking. I hope that is still the case in two more months when spring finally gets here for real.


Two good healthy hives means that I can make 2 splits and go into next winter with four hives. It seems it is two steps forward , one back, but eventually I hope my hives will be self sustainable. We are supposed to be preppers, so having hives that don't need  constant baby sitting would be ideal for me.