Author Topic: Malaysian Plane Goes Down in Ukraine  (Read 1050 times)

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Offline livingpower

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Malaysian Plane Goes Down in Ukraine
« on: July 17, 2014, 01:30:13 PM »

Source: http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2014/07/17/malaysian_passenger_plane_crashes_in_east_ukraine.html
A Malaysian passenger plane carrying 295 people crashed over east Ukaine on Thursday, with one Ukrainian official saying it was shot down.
Anton Gerashenko, an adviser to Ukraine’s Interior Minister, said on his Facebook page the plane was flying at an altitude of 10,000 metres when it was hit by a missile fired from a Buk launcher.
Authorities do now know what exactly caused the plane to crash. There were a reported 280 passengers and 15 crew members on board.
Ukrainian authorities are having a hard time reaching the crash site, near the town of Grabovo, because it is in pro-Russian separatist held territory, reported The New York Times.
Speaking in Kyiv, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said an investigation into what happened is already underway.
“We do not exclude that this plane was shot down, and we stress that the Armed Forces of Ukraine did not take action against any airborne targets. We are sure that those who are guilty in this tragedy will be held responsible,” Poroshenko said.
A similar launcher was seen by Associated Press journalists near the eastern Ukrainian town of Snizhne earlier Thursday. The Buk missile system can fire missiles up to an altitude of 22,000 metres.
However, the pro-Russian separatists in the area do not have a Buk missile system, reported the Russian news service ITAR-TASS.
Malaysia Airlines said on its Twitter feed that it “has lost contact of MH17 from Amsterdam. The last known position was over Ukrainian airspace. More details to follow.”
The Boeing 777 Malaysia Airline plane, en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, crashed about 60 kilometres from the Russian border, according to ITAR-TASS.
It was scheduled to fly into Russian airspace at 17:20 Moscow standard time, the agency said, adding the Boeing 777 did not communicate with Russian air traffic controllers, ITAR-TASS said.
“However, it fell down 60 kilometres from the border; the plane’s emergency location beacon went off,” a source told the Russian news agency. They are reporting no Russian citizens were on board.
On Thursday, Boeing issued a statement on the incident, saying they are ready to provide whatever assistance is required by authorities.
“Our thoughts and prayers are with those on board the Malaysia Airlines airplane lost over Ukrainian airspace, as well as their families and loved ones,” the Boeing statement said.
In the past week, two Ukrainian planes have been shot down in the area near to where intense fighting has taken place between Ukrainian soldiers and pro-Russia separatists.
On Monday, a Ukrainian military transport plane was shot down.
And on Thursday, Ukrainian officials say a Russian jet shot down a Ukrainian SU-24, with a missile, over Donetsk.
Russia has long been among the world’s leader in the development of anti-aircraft guided missiles.
Dan Wasserbly, Americas editor with Jane’s Defence Weekly, an industry journal published in London, said the BUK surface-to-air systems were developed in the late 1970s and are still widely in use.
In 2012, the Russian arms exporter Rosoboronexport said it was sending the advanced BUK missile system to Syria. The company’s general director said at the time that the BUK-M2’s anti-aircraft missiles could hit planes flying at up to 25,000 metres.
“Could it hit a passenger plane flying at 10,000 metres? The short answer is yes,” Wasserbly said in an interview with the Star’s Rick Westhead.
Typically, the BUK system, which Wasserbly said costs about 500 million euros, features two missile launchers fixed two a trailer platform. The system is usually equipped with eight missiles.
There are several variants of the Russian-made Buk, called an SA-11 ‘Gadfly’ by NATO, but the baseline version entered operational service in 1979, Wasserbly said.
He said the missile has an “intercept altitude envelope between 30 metres and 22 kilometres. “It has inertial guidance and can receive mid-course command updates,” Wasserbly said, adding that the BUK purportedly uses a flight profile whereby it climbs up and then dives toward the target.
This is the second recent tragedy for Malaysia Airlines — Flight 370 disappeared in March while en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. After an intense international search, the plane has yet to be found.
With files from The Associated Press and the Star’s Rick Westhead.

Offline livingpower

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Offline zeker

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Re: Malaysian Plane Goes Down in Ukraine
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2014, 03:52:28 PM »
sry LP.. didnt see your post ahead of mine. mods plz merge or delete mine.. ty
of all the things I,ve lost.. I miss my mind, the most